THE 38TH CHICAGO LATINO FILM FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES ITS SELECTIONS FOR THEIR CLOSING AND LATE NIGHT SCREENINGS AT CHI-TOWN MOVIES DRIVE-IN

The Midwest premiere of Francisca Alegría’s magical realist feature debut The Cow who Sang a Song into the Future will close the Festival on Saturday, April 30th followed by a late night screening of Rodrigo Bellott’s giallo-influenced Blood-Red Ox.

There will be one more day of in-person screenings at the Landmark Century Center, 2828 N. Clark St., on Sunday, May 1st as well as that being the final day to access films virtually throughout the Midwest.

CHICAGO (March 22, 2022) – The 38th Chicago Latino Film Festival, presented by Corona Extra, announced today its selections for their Closing and Late Night screenings at ChiTown Movies Drive-In, 2343 S. Throop St., Saturday, April 30th

The Festival closes with the Midwest premiere of Chilean director Francisca Alegría’s feature debut The Cow who Sang a Song into the Future starring Mía Maestro, Alfredo Castro and Leonor Varela. The gates for the Closing Night screening open at 6:30 pm with the film scheduled to start at 7:30 p.m.  The Cow who Sang a Song into the Future will screen exclusively at the Drive-In.

It will be followed by a late night screening of Blood-Red Ox, Bolivian director Rodrigo Bellott’s first incursion into horror and the first film in a potential trilogy. Gates for this Late Night screening open at 10:00pm with the film scheduled to start at 11 p.m. Blood-Red Ox will be available to screen virtually via Eventive on April 30th and May 1st to residents of Illinois and the Midwest states of Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan and Indiana.

There will be one more day of in-person screenings at the Landmark Century Center, 2828 N. Clark St., on Sunday, May 1st with most films still available online throughout the Midwest.

The Cow Who Sang a Song into the Future opens with thousands of fish dying in a polluted river in southern Chile. They sing as they gasp their final breaths and a woman dressed in a motorcycle jacket and helmet emerges from among their bodies. She is Magdalena (Mía Maestro), a woman who committed suicide many years ago. Upon seeing her in the streets of the nearby town, her widowed husband (Alfredo Castro) suffers a heart attack. Their daughter Cecilia (Leonor Varela) arrives with her children to help her brother tend to the family’s farm as her son Tomás, who identifies as a woman, establishes a deep connection with his mostly silent resurrected grandmother. That description barely scratches the surface of Francisca Alegría’s impressive fable-like feature debut about the fragility of family and the environment.

With Blood-Red Ox, Bellott (Tu Me Manques, an official selection of our 36th edition) follows the footsteps of horror masters of Dario Argento and Mario Bava to tell the story of Lebanese American journalist Amir and his boyfriend Amat who visit a town in Bolivia that is being threatened by an oil company. Amat suddenly starts to see visions of a giant blood red ox; as Amir tries to save him from these paranoid attacks, he begins to wonder if he is also losing his mind. The first film in a projected trilogy, Blood-Red Ox will take viewers on an intense hallucinogenic trip to the heart of madness.

“Family relationships may be at the heart of Francisca’s feature debut, but deep down her film is much more than that. It’s a thought-provoking visually rich exploration of our fragile relationship with the environment,” said Pepe Vargas, founder and executive director of the International Latino Cultural Center of Chicago. “Bellott, like Panama’s Abner Benaim and Guatemala’s Jayro Bustamante, has become a one-man film industry in his country. Blood-Red Ox is a great example of his willingness to experiment with other genres and elevate his country’s profile in world cinema.”

Produced by the International Latino Cultural Center of Chicago, the 38th Chicago Latino Film Festival, April 21st-May 1st, will showcase films from all over Latin America, Spain, Portugal and the United States. The Festival will once again adopt a hybrid format with in-person screenings at the Landmark Century Center, 2828 N. Clark St., several Drive-In presentations at ChiTown Movies, 2343 S. Throop St., and with virtual screenings via Eventive accessible to residents of Illinois and the Midwest states of Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan and Indiana. 

Applications for media accreditation are now open and are due Monday, April 4.

ABOUT THE FILMMAKERS

Francisca Alegría is an award-winning filmmaker who obtained her degree in Directing from the Universidad Católica de Chile and her M.F.A. in Screenwriting and Film Directing at Columbia University. Her short film And The Whole Sky Fit in the Dead Cow’s Eye received the award for Best International Fiction Short Film at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, Best Latin American Short Film at Miami Film Festival and was selected at Telluride Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, and New York Film Festival. Alegría’s debut feature, The Cow who Sang a Song into the Future was selected for the Sundance Screenwriters and Directors Labs and will premiere in the World Cinema Dramatic Competition at the 2022 Sundance Film Festival.

Rodrigo Bellot is known as one of Bolivia’s most prominent visual artists. In 2001, he helmed his breakout hit, Sexual Dependency, which won the Fipresci Award in Locarno and became Bolivia’s first official selection competing for Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards. In 2007, Variety named Bellott as one of the Top Ten Latin American talents to watch. He later produced his first American horror film, We Are What We Are, which premiered at the Director’s Fortnight section at the Cannes Film Festival. In addition to his filmmaking, Bellott wrote Tu Me Manques, which he turned into an experimental multimedia theater production about the suicide of his closeted lover and then into a film, also selected as the Bolivian entry for the Best International Feature Film at the Academy Awards.

TICKET INFORMATION

These are two separate shows.

Tickets for each screening (maximum 6 passengers) are: general, $55 per car; ILCC members, $44 per car. All ticketing fees are included in the price. Tickets must be purchased in advance. No in-person sales at the Drive-in. 

Tickets are now on sale at chicagolatinofilmfestival.org.

SPONSORS

The 38th Chicago Latino Film Festival is presented by Corona Extra and sponsored by: Xfinity, US Bank, Prado & Renteria, Lopez & Co., Nordstrom, Tristan & Cervantes, The Whitehall Hotel, Consulate General de Chile, Illinois Film Office and BTEC 

Media Sponsors: WBEZ/Vocalo, WTTW, CAN TV, La Raza, Telemundo Chicago/NBC-5 and Chicago Latino Network

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT

The 38th Chicago Latino Film Festival receives additional support from: Chicago’s Cultural Treasures, Paul M. Angell Family Foundation, The Reva and David Logan Foundation, The MacArthur Fund for Culture, Equity, and Arts at Prince, The Field Foundation, The National Endowment for the Arts, Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, The Joyce Foundation, Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs (DCASE), Illinois Arts Council — a State Agency, and Instituto Cervantes.

ABOUT THE ILCC

The International Latino Cultural Center of Chicago is a pan-Latino, nonprofit, multidisciplinary arts organization dedicated to developing, promoting and increasing awareness of Latino cultures among Latinos and other communities by presenting a wide variety of art forms and education including film, music, dance, visual arts, comedy, theater and culinary arts.

The Center prides itself for its outstanding multidisciplinary local and international cultural programming which spans Latin America, Spain, Portugal, and the United States. 

Born out of the Chicago Latino Film Festival, The International Latino Cultural Center of Chicago also produces other programs, including the Latino Music Series, which will celebrate its 16th edition this year; Film in the Parks, also in its 16th season; the monthly Reel Film Club, already in its 13th year; and many others. All in all, the audience has grown from 500 people in 1985 for the first Chicago Latino Film Festival to more than 70,000 (Latinos and non-Latinos) who enjoy the year-round multidisciplinary cross-cultural exchanges offered by the Center.